Dealing With The Younger Generation

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(By Laurie Kahn) It seems like the younger generation wants immediate results so often get frustrated at the prospect of sales taking so long to build. How can we set realistic expectations without scaring them away?

Good question and yes, the younger generation is fast moving and not as patient as previous generations. There are a variety of things you can do to help them on-board and ramp up.

First, you need a very detailed job profile that covers all training, expectations, what a typical day looks like, so they have an understanding. Better yet, have them meet with an experienced seller who is closer to their age to share their experience when they started, and if possible, have them listen in on some calls so they have a stronger idea of their job.

Second, and crucial to their success and you not losing your hiring investment in them, is to assign short- and long-term goals for them to meet. These are not revenue goals but tasks. They need to see that they are meeting some accomplishments and goals while moving in the right direction. They should have goals for every week and a recap meeting to ascertain where they are in meeting them. They can include training projects, number of appointments, having them create a promotion and a presentation, creating a list of prospects, writing out their phone scripts for getting appointments, leaving voice mails, and sending emails.

Third, stop having new people start with no billing accounts. Even if you need to handle the calls yourself with the new hire, let them get involved right away so they see how it is done. Ask for their opinion and feedback. Not only are these excellent training moments, but they will feel better about receiving an order.

Other things you can do to gain buy-in from the start is to share the mission of the company and how they fit in to the big picture. Show how important each cog is in the wheel. Put a high value on each individual for their contribution and how they come together as a team.

Don’t forget to talk up how you help the community Discuss the community service and volunteer projects you are involved in each year and include, with examples, of small businesses you have helped grow through your partnerships.

To keep them interested and productive offer regular reviews and feedback with encouragement so they see what they are doing well and what needs improvement. Many are challenge oriented with the ability to research and create solutions to grow. If there are areas where they need to increase skills offer them education or guide them on where to find what they need.

The bottom line comes down to being fully transparent, realistic, and having no surprises after hire. Let them know all details in advance.

Laurie Kahn is the creator and founder of Media Staffing Network. She can be reached by e-mail at [email protected]

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