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Telecom Act: 20 Years Later

The Telecom Act 20 Years Later — David Pearlman & John Gehron

In every issue of Radio Ink in 2016, we’re taking a look back at the 1996 legislation that changed the radio industry. David Pearlman and John Gehron were both in the thick of the action during the early days of consolidation. We spoke to both of them.

Telecom Act 20 Years Later – Randy Michaels

In every issue of Radio Ink in 2016, we’re taking a look back at the 1996 legislation that changed the radio industry. Then-Jacor CEO Randy Michaels talks to Radio Ink about those heady times and how he sees the Act in retrospect.
Eddie_Fritts16

Telecom Act 20 Years Later – Eddie Fritts

In every issue of Radio Ink in 2016, we’re taking a look back at the 1996 leg­islation that changed the radio industry. The 1996 Telecommunications Act spawned deregulation, and to this day the debate rages on about whether radio is better off as a result. Here’s a look back at the Telecommunications Act of 1996 with Eddie Fritts.

Telecom Act 20 Years Later — Steve Hicks

Steve Hicks will go down in history as the person who created radio’s first ever duopoly. It was back in 1990, in Jackson, Mississippi. He was also right in the middle of the action when radio’s ownership rules changed: At the helm of Capstar Broadcasting, he took full advantage of those new rules. Hicks founded and served as CEO of Capstar, which became a leading consolidator of middle-market stations across the country. Ultimately Capstar owned 350 stations, the most of any company at the time.

Telecom Act 20 Years Later – Mark Mays

In every issue of Radio Ink in 2016, we’ll take a look back at the 1996 legislation that rocked the radio industry. The 1996 Telecommunications Act spawned deregulation, and to this day there is a debate about whether radio is better off as a result — or if it was damaged, perhaps irreparably. We will never really solve that riddle.

The View From Former FCC Chairman Reed Hundt

The debate rages to this day. There are those who believe deregulation and consolidation after the Telecommunications Act of 1996 ruined radio, homogenized its sound, and killed jobs. Others argue that still more deregulation is needed, saying national scale is important for radio to keep up against more competition for the attention of consumers than ever before.