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Has Consolidation Critically Injured Radio?



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(1/4/2013 12:02:25 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
I love the new iBiquity logo!
- LMFAO!!!
(1/3/2013 10:00:30 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Radio has always been a brutal, cutthroat business.

In the 1970s I worked for management that bought a station, walked in the next day, fired everyone except the receptionist, and went on the air with an entirely new air staff.

T'was ever thus.

- Steve
(1/3/2013 3:03:28 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
In an eralier comment, someone mentioned that what is missing in radio these days is FUN. I agree. But equally important, and equally missing is PASSION. Radio has always been a business of course, but of late it seems to have evolved into a BUSINESS! Cold,calculating and cruel. The creative part seems to have been replaced by the balance sheet and overseen by a bunch of bean counters. What happned to all the people who actually LOVED radio and would work and work and work for lousy money because they had a serious passion for it? Oh, I know...they've all been fired. I spent 20 years in small markets and big markets, and it breaks my heart to see what these money vultures have done to "my" radio.
- Tom Darrah (aka Daren)
(1/3/2013 12:47:13 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content

An objective analysis of the impact of consolidation in the radio industry might lead one to conclude that the process is birthing a much-needed evolution through the forced process of adaptive innovation.

The consolidators are actually benefitting small market operators on at least a couple of obvious fronts:

First, they are paying the price for being first adopters in what will quickly become a huge market for “off- the-shelf” products from digital media service providers;

Second, they are conceding perhaps 85% to 90% of the total radio revenue in many medium and smaller markets by focusing on the type of transactional business that a “national footprint” (de facto network) traditionally attracts.

While ownership consolidation certainly presents huge challenges in the short term, the long term competitive strategy and, conceivably, the advantage to small and medium market operators should be obvious.

Step up your game and you may wind up actually being grateful to radio’s “big-boys” in the long-run.

- Paul W Robinson
(1/3/2013 12:37:43 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
What are they going to do? Fire me? Send me to Vietnam...? Besides, these guys pay no attention to reason, logic or alternative strategies anyway. They've already got it all figured out. Thanks for comin' out. :)
- Ronald T. Robinson
(1/3/2013 11:30:15 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Cumulus mentioned specifically? Aren't you guys scared of the "Big Bad Wolf"?
These guys are the most RUTHLESS Aholes on the planet!

- Master Blaster
(1/3/2013 11:25:28 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Indeed, there was a time when one had to demonstrate skills and professionalism to work in the higher echelons of this business. Now, all that is required is a pulse and a willingness to accept an abusive paycheck. On-air is no longer a meaningful position for a grownup.
- Ronald T. Robinson


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